Monday, November 04, 2019

View from the Top: Disney Studio



After a ten year hiatus, I returned to the Walt Disney Studio in Burbank for a visit. Parking in the Zorro garage (which replaced the area where the Disney “Zorro” TV series was filmed), I admired the stained glass portraits of some of Disney’s most famous animated characters.

Designed by Michael Graves in 1990, the primary building at the Studio is called the Team Disney Burbank building. It contains the office of President and CEO Robert A. Iger, as well as the boardroom for the Board of Directors. The building is sometimes referred to as the “Seven Dwarfs Building” because of the gigantic statues holding up the roof of the building. On January 23, 2006, in honor of Michael Eisner's 21-year leadership of the company, the Team Disney building, was rededicated as Team Disney - The Michael D. Eisner Building.

Today, whatever you do, DON’T call it the Eisner Building!



Ever wondered what the view was from the building? Wonder no more.



Or how it would look framed by a Mickey from one of the chairs in the private dining room?



Some closeups of the Dwarfs’ arms holding up the building:







The final one today is Daisy Duck’s portrait at the Zorro Garage:



More photos coming up from my trip to the Walt Disney Studio!

See more Disney Studio photos at my main website.

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3 comments:

Matthew said...

What a beautiful day in Glendale! I remember working at the Studio on some beautiful fall days... with the winds blowing all the "guck" out of the valley and leaving you with just stunning views! Hope you had a fantastic day and I look forward to more photos!

Always your pal,
Amazon Belle

Daveland said...

Yes, the weather was perfect...and great to see the Disney campus that Walt helped create!

Fifthrider said...

Thanks for the shots of what it looks like from the inside out. I've seen pics facing the building but nothing looking the opposite way for perspective. The courtyard and size of the building are angular and menacing. Albert Speer would be proud.