Tuesday, February 19, 2019

Temple Tuesday: Judy's Husband



Here is Shirley with David Rose, Judy Garland’s first husband. At the time this shot was taken, Judy and David had barely been married a year...with only 2 more left before they divorced.

The radio program Shirley was performing in was “Junior Miss,” a CBS situation comedy sponsored by Procter and Gamble. The series was first heard on Wednesday evenings from March 4, 1942 to August 26, 1942, with Shirley as Judy Graves. Sally Benson, best known for her novel Meet Me in St. Louis, also wrote “Junior Miss.”



Rose was the musical director for the show. The two seemed to be enjoying a light moment here.



A serious moment in the show:



Look at Shirley emote!



If you noticed the bracelet that Shirley is wearing, it sold in the “Love, Shirley Temple, Take Two: From Schoolgirl to Storybook” 2015 auction. Here’s the catalog description and photo:

SHIRLEY TEMPLE'S ALPHABET DIE-CUT ID BRACELET

7 1/2". The bracelet is formed of stylized cut-out letters in brass and gold-plated finish, spelling the name Shirley Temple. Suspended from the clasp is a brass circular plate inscribed "Shirley Temple" on one side, and "227 N. Rockingham Rd., West Los Angeles" on the other. Included is a photograph of Shirley Temple wearing the bracelet which was a favorite of hers while a young lady. Circa 1940.

Realized Price: $10,000
Presale Estimate: 800+



I’m still reeling over the estimate versus the final price. Wowza.

See more teen Shirley Temple photos at my main website.

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Monday, February 18, 2019

Frontierland On A Monday



November 14, 1957...on a day much like what Southern California is currently experiencing...overcast, possibly a bit wet...I present to you: FRONTIERLAND!! Closer...



and closer! The lonely security guard just wanders through an empty Frontierland. You can just barely see the corner of the Pepsi Cola banner at the Golden Horseshoe Saloon.



LOVE this overhead shot of the Rainbow Caverns Mine Train attraction with the Conestoga Wagon and Stagecoach in the foreground.



Westward Ho!



See more Disneyland Frontierland photos at my main website.

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Friday, February 15, 2019

TGIF at the Garden of Allah pool



While many classic vintage Hollywood photos show movie stars poolside, rarely do they show them IN the pool. Above is one of actress Eve Brent at the infamous Garden of Allah Hotel. Brent’s claim to fame was that she starred in “Tarzan’s Fight for Life’ (1958) as Jane; Gordon Scott played Tarzan. Brent also had a bit part in the 1999 Tom Hanks film “The Green Mile” before she passed away in 2011.

Below is a previously posted shot of actress Martha O’Driscoll, also posing beside (but not in) the Garden of Allah pool, circa 1937:



Two shots follow from the USC Digital Library. Dick Stagg is shown instructing seven-year-old Terry Miller how to swim:



Here’s one of the first shots of the pool during construction, 1926:



...and one of the last photos, shot for Life Magazine at the Final Farewell Party in August 1959 before the property was leveled to make way for a bank...which is now about to get leveled for a Frank Gehry monstrosity.



THAT'S karma!

See more Garden of Allah photos at my main website.

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Wednesday, February 13, 2019

Neglect of a Frank Lloyd Wright Treasure



An interesting yet sad article on the Curbed website shines a very unflattering light on USC's School of Architecture and their neglect of a lesser known Frank Lloyd Wright treasure.

I had never heard of the Samuel Freeman home when I visited it three years ago and was astounded that yet another Frank Lloyd Wright masterpiece existed right under my nose. Built in 1924 for Samuel Freeman and his wife Harriet, it was inspired by their love for Wright’s Hollyhock House in East Hollywood. The exterior has approximately 12,000 textile blocks, minus the ones that have been stolen over the years.



The Freemans ran their house as an artistic and political “salon” until the 1986, when the Freemans donated their house to USC. According to the Frank Lloyd Wright website, the building was stabilized in 2005 and is undergoing additional renovations due to earthquake damage. When I visited, our guide told a different tale. A change in the faculty at the school had shifted interest, and other than having students act as live-in caretakers, the house had basically been frozen in limbo with very little work done on it for years. This information is echoed in the Curbed article, along with stories of missing/stolen furniture and light fixtures that USC has allegedly been aware of but kept very quiet about.



Looking at the photos I shot, you can see that this diamond is very much in the rough and needs more than just TLC.



The views of Hollywood Boulevard and Franklin Avenue are incredible:





…but the interior looks as if it was picked clean.



Wright must be rolling over in his grave over this living situation:





Here’s to hoping USC steps up to the plate and puts some attention (and money) towards fixing this tarnished treasure.



See more Frank Lloyd Wright photos at my main website.

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Tuesday, February 12, 2019

Temple Tuesday: Celebrating Abe



In honor of what would have been Abraham Lincoln’s 210th birthday, today’s Temple Tuesday post honors the nation’s 16th President with two instances of where Shirley and Abe’s lives intersected. Well, in the land of make believe at least.

In 1935, Shirley had one of her biggest hits with “The Littlest Rebel.” Set during the Civil War, her character begged Lincoln to pardon her father from being hanged. I don’t even need to tell you what the result was. The first photo today shows Frank McGlynn signing Shirley’s autograph book between scenes. McGlynn’s resemblance to the President is uncanny.

Six years later, Shirley appeared on the CBS Lux Radio Theatre in their adaptation of “The Littlest Rebel.” No longer a little child, it didn’t matter as nobody could see her on the radio anyway (shades of Woody Allen’s “Radio Days.” If you’ve seen it, you’ll know what I’m talking about). Airing on October 14, McGlynn and Temple were the only actors that appeared in both the film AND the radio version. Here’s a rare shot of the performance:



A close-up of Shirley:



The cast also featured Preston Foster (as the Northern Colonel), Bea Benaderet (“Petticoat Junction”), and Leigh Whipper. Claude Rains can be seen seated in the chair, taking over the role of Shirley’s father (played by John Boles in the movie version). Rains is probably best known as the cynical police chief Captain Renault in “Casablanca” ("round up the usual suspects").



Hosted by Cecil B. DeMille, this turned out to be Shirley's only full-length radio dramatization.

See more teen Shirley photos at my main website.

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Monday, February 11, 2019

Savannah Union Station



It’s always hard for me to imagine that a building as grand as the Savannah Union Station is no more. Designed by architect Frank Pierce Milburn (Augusta Georgia’s Union Station designer as well), the 1902 Spanish Renaissance and Elizabethan structure was demolished in 1962 to make room for Interstate 16’s exit ramps. Oh the indignity. At least there are some images of the grandeur that used to be.

Here’s an interior shot of the building’s octagonal rotunda, which served as the general waiting room.



A few detailed views of what appears to be a fountain:



…and the building’s newsstand:



Today, a gas station occupies the land. Ugh.

See more Savannah, Georgia photos at my main website.

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Wednesday, February 06, 2019

Fremont Street District Neon



Las Vegas looks completely different at night as opposed to how it appears during the day. The Fremont Street District is no exception. Walking around the one night I stayed here, I found myself snapping vintage neon every block and going further and further away...until my Spidey sense began to tingle and I returned to the hotel. I usually listen to my Spidey sense.



I don't know what it is about vintage neon that gets to me. Maybe the retro-ness of it...the soothing glow...the saturated colors...



Atomic cocktails...do they come with a dose of radiation?



Bring your llama!



He’s not neon, but I got a kick out of this "person" climbing up the pole.



An old gas station has been converted into the Empty Club.



Yup. It’s empty alright.



Night:



vs. Day:



See more Fremont Street photos at my main website.

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Tuesday, February 05, 2019

Temple Tuesday: Shirley & Eleanor



At the peak of her childhood fame, visitors flocked to the 20th Century-Fox soundstages to meet Shirley Temple. First Lady Eleanor Roosevelt was not exception to the rule. She visited Shirley in March 1938 during the filming of the courtroom scenes from “Little Miss Broadway.”

“FIRST LADY” VISITS SHIRLEY TEMPLE

HOLLYWOOD, CALIF.: The “First Lady of the Land” met the “First Lady of Hollywood” and discussed such important subjects as geography and grandchildren. The meeting came when Mrs. Franklin D. Roosevelt, touring the film capital, expressed her desire to see Shirley Temple, 8-year-old 20th Century-Fox star. Mrs. Roosevelt stopped at a set to watch the child star do a dance number with comedian Jimmy Durante — after which the “First Lady” and Shirley chatted for ten minutes. 3-17-38


The number Temple and Durante was filming, “Hop, Skip, Jump and Slide” was ultimately deleted from the movie.



Amazingly enough, the footage still exists today:



A previously posted shot of another visitor to the courtroom set, Joan Crawford. Her meeting with Shirley occurred while the grand finale/title song was being filmed.



It’s amazing Shirley got all her work done with all of these famous people interrupting filming!

See more Shirley Temple photos at my main website.

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Monday, February 04, 2019

Fremont Street District, Pt. 1



Fremont Street has the distinction of being the first paved street in Las Vegas. Before “The Strip” took over, this was the area where most movies and TV shows filmed when they were using Las Vegas as a location, including “Viva Las Vegas,” “Diamonds Are Forever,” and “Vegas Vacation.”



The neon cowboy in this shot is known as Vegas Vic. Although his home, the Pioneer Club, is no longer a casino, this Las Vegas icon has survived since 1951, although I don’t believe he is turned on anymore. Some of the better known clubs still in existence include Four Queens:



and Binion’s:



As part of a program to renovate this downtown Las Vegas area, the “Fremont Street Experience” was created at the western end of Fremont Street in 1995.



If you like to live life for the thrills, how about the SlotZilla Zip Line?



Eating at White Castle could provide a different type of thrill:



Stay tuned: more Fremont Street on the way!



See more Fremont Street photos at my main website.

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