Tuesday, March 20, 2007

Indian Village & Mystery Construction


These slides probably would have never made it to this blog other than a detail I noticed last night as I was scanning them. At first, when I scanned this slide from February 1960, I dismissed the structure at the top as some kind of teepee or shelter, but when I zoomed in, I could see a steel frame. I could hazard a guess (say, New Orleans Square/Pirates Building or The Haunted Mansion), but I’ll leave that up to the experts out there.

This slide is also from the same Feb. 1960 batch.



The next three are from July 1961, and show the legendary Indian Village, Teepees (complete with signage!), and the Ceremonial Dance Circle.








This last shot is from July 1968 and shows the “new” Indian Village complete with amphitheater that the Major mentioned recently on his blog.


For more vintage & current Disneyland Indian Village photos, visit my regular website.

4 comments:

Squalls Ahead said...

The construction is Cascade Peak. You can see a portion of the Rivers Of America in the lower left portion of the photo, with Tom Sawyer's Island in the background, and Cascade Peak which, of course, is on the east side of the Rivers Of America.

Davelandweb said...

Thanks Squalls; never even crossed my mind that it could be Cascade Peak. This does bring up a question for me; it looks like a steel frame to me, yet I thought I remembered Tangaroa saying something about it being all-wood, which is why the thing was in such bad shape and had to be dozed.

Major Pepperidge said...

Yeah, that's Cascade Peak alright. You are right, I thought that I'd read about it being all wood as well. Perhaps the steel framing was very minimal, and the majority of the framing was wood. Maybe. Either that or the "suits" decided they just wanted the peak gone rather than pay to restore it!

FoxxFur said...

You can see pretty clearly that the peak itself is wood built over a very minor steel frame. It's pretty rough construction by today's standards. The Matterhorn had to have a multi-year several-phase refurbishment to avoid the same fate as Cascade Peak.