Friday, September 17, 2010

Glorious 1950’s Black & White, Pt. 5



Dipping into the batch of black and white negatives I posted a few weeks ago we find this detailed shot of the Fantasyland Autopia. Zooming in for the line queue and a look at the signage (of course I couldn't resist!):



Any ideas as to what this construction is for? The Viewliner?



From the Skyway, the photographer got a few Storybook Land & Casey Junior shots:



Watch out for spitballs!



Know anybody taking this journey through Storybook Land?



As we head closer to Fantasyland, our Skyway Bucket takes us by the Chicken of the Sea Pirate Ship Restaurant. Hungry for a Tuna Boat?





Last one from the Skyway journey shows Fantasyland:



This marks the end of this particular B&W series. Stay tuned for more black and white in the future!

In the land of color, the latest installment of the “Tinker Bell” series will be released next Tuesday. Thumbs up again for “Tinker Bell and The Great Fairy Rescue.” I haven’t expected much from any of the three movies, and with each one, I find myself disappointed that they didn’t get a full theatrical release. This movie also explains the whole Tinker Bell talks issue, and should resolve it for those who have been angry about her being given a voice. Here’s video from the “Picnic-in-the-Park” World Premiere:



The very special outdoor premiere of Disney’s All-New Movie “Tinker Bell and the Great Fairy Rescue” was screened for more than 1,000 families in the local Los Angeles area. The event featured a dozen of L.A.’s most popular food trucks (including Top Chef alum Brian Hill’s) along with a bevy of activity stations for the kids such as face painting, Tink tattoos, coloring stations, and Radio Disney (who emceed the event). All fairy attendees received Tinker Bell blankets, Tinker Bell glow sticks, Fairy wings and enjoyed many Fairy activities. You can read the full review of this movie at my website.



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9 comments:

Thufer said...

I have officially ran out of descriptive words for this series of pictures. I not only like them; heck, I like them a lot.
Gems in the Treasure Box know as the 'Golden Age' of the Park. Tasty, beauty-mus and persistently haunting in there absence. Never will we be able to go back to this time. Not even Master Showman of the World could bring us back to the simple joy provided in this kingdom at that time.

Sorry, I will hush now.

Connie Moreno said...

When I first starting reading today's post, I thought you were joking. Autopia? So little? And then I realized you WEREN'T kidding. Wow!!

JG said...

Everything is so barren and empty...I guess I prefer it all a little overgrown. Like my yard.

Thanks for the pics.

JG

Major Pepperidge said...

That first photo is a beaut! As you can see, the sign says "Jr" Autopia, so it predates the "Fantasyland Autopia" moniker. I wonder if that construction is for the Motor Boat Cruise?

Davelandweb said...

Yes Major - saw that. It says "Jr. Autopia of Fantasyland." I doubt it's for the Motor Boat Cruise; the location is close to where the Mickey Mouse Club Circus used to be...close to the train tracks. You can see it in color here:

http://davelandweb.com/autopia/images/juniorautopia/KTPBK_12_56_N18B.jpg

CoxPilot said...

Would that possibly be the Viewliner depot? Or was the Viewliner already somewhere else?

Davelandweb said...

Lee - that's what I thought it might be...about the only thing I could think of that might have required that size of form.

outsidetheberm said...

That construction 'might' be part of the water reclaimation system. Doesn't the circulation and flow for the entire park begin - and cycle - through this general area? Just a thought.

Great pictures!

walterworld said...

I believe that the construction is for the Submarine drydock, which is still there to this day. You can view it from the DLRR just before you reach the area where the Monorail spur-line is located.

Great post!